TBBP Night at Sam Ash

Bassist Keith Russell is the first to try Miles' loop pedal

Bassist Keith Russell is the first to try Miles' loop pedal

The November 12th installment of Tampa Bay Bass Players Night at Sam Ash started as a well intentioned discussion of the difficulty inherent in playing over songs with minimal harmonic material or extended two/four chord vamps. Through the course of the evening it became a discussion of how to create loops to practice over. Joe Grady demonstrated how to use Garage Band and Miles Hanson demonstrated how to use the TC Electronics Ditto pedal for creating loops. 

 

New TBBP member Blake Waters was on hand with his fretless Rob Allen Mouse 30 bass. A beautifully crafted instrument that is so light it feels like you're holding nothing. It's so responsive that it sounded different with each player who played it. For more pics see the gallery at the end of the TBBP page

Blake Waters playing his Rob Allen Mouse 30

Blake Waters playing his Rob Allen Mouse 30

 

For the next meeting on December 10 I'd like to continue the discussion and get more into the "nuts and bolts" of joining two chords together. What does one do when faced with a song where you're only playing two chords for an extended time? How do you make it interesting, keep the flow, keep yourself from being bored? For an example check out John McVie's work on Fleetwood Mac's DreamsHe's basically just playing TWO notes through the whole song (with an occasional chromatic fill or a fifth thrown in from time to time). What are some other songs that consist of only two chords? How do you keep from going crazy when you're playing them?